英文翻译:中国退伍军人维权势头不容忽视

A Google search turned up quite a few articles on this by Chinese language press inside and outside the Chinese mainland picking up on  a Kyodo press agency report.  http://www.google.co.jp/#hl=ja&site=&source=hp&q=%E4%B8%9C%E4%BA%9A%E6%88%98%E7%95%A5%E6%A6%82%E8%A7%82++%E6%97%A5%E6%9C%AC+%E9%98%B2&btnK=Google+%E6%A4%9C%E7%B4%A2&oq=&aq=&aqi=&aql=&gs_l=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=53a5e9b94557a834&biw=1600&bih=739

I haven’t found the Japanese language text though of the Japanese Self-Defense Ministry report though. Perhaps it is not online. I did come across the Kyodo News Agency’s Chinese language website at http://china.kyodonews.jp/   Kyodo had a Chinese-language article on this topic yesterday but it is subscriber-only content.  The title of the article is

日本发布最新《东亚战略概观》称朝核形势严峻  The Chinese articles are reporting on the Kyodo report about the Japanese government report rather than passing along the Kyodo report, nothing unusual about that.  Comparing the Kyodo original and the mainland press stories could be interesting since it might reflect Propaganda Department guidance.

I saw the RFA article on the Tianwang website of the China Tianwang Human Rights Center in Chengdu at 64tianwang.com

http://www.64tianwang.com/bencandy.php?fid-9-id-9541-page-1.htm

The Rights Protection Trend Among Retired Military Cannot Be Ignored

by Wen Yuqing Radio Free Asia Cantonese Language Section March 31, 2012

In recent years rights protection activities by retired military has become more common throughout China. The authorities, in order to eliminate this unstable element, have recently been constantly carrying out stabilization work among old soldiers. In the Japanese government’s recent report on the East Asia strategic outlook, this trend could lead to social unrest.

RFA made inquiries with several retired military in Hunan Province. Some immediately hung up when our journalist called. Several said that lately many people had been warned by the authorities not to talk with the media outside mainland China and they are now all afraid. They refused to be interviewed.

He said, … “I can’t take a phone call now, I feel very anxious.”

Journalist asked, “Is this about something recent?”

He answered, “Yes”

Journalist asked, “Can you say why?”

He answered, “This is a very troublesome matter.”

Liu Zhihe, a retired Hunan soldier who served in Guangxi Province told the Rights Protection Network said that recently in Guangdong Province retired soldiers held mass meeting to try to get paid. This inspired the Hunan Province retired soldiers to also plan to hold a mass meeting to make their own appeals. On Thursday, the authorities in the name of preserving social stability informed him that ‘Now some retired military people are being stirred up by bad people and are doing some things that are not advantageous to social stability’ and said that Liu Zhihe should have nothing to do with them.

Qu Shitao, a transferred-from-the-military cadres in a Yentai City, Shandong Province company, said he had also received a warning from the government recently. He said that on Wednesday (March 28, 2012) the Public Security Bureau’s State Security Detachment (Guobao) asked them he not allow himself to be used by media from outside mainland China. Qu Shitao said, there are over 10,000 transferred-from-the-military cadres in Yentai City companies and if other categories of retired soldiers are added in, it is hard to estimate how many retired soldiers there are in Yentai City. The problems with their welfare benefits and payments have been outstanding for years and still have not been resolved. He believes that the authorities made their recent request that retired soldiers not accept interviews from media outside the mainland because they realize that in recent years retired soldiers have increasingly made their appeals in mass meetings and street demonstrations. The authorities fear that these appeals will become even more widespread and so made this warning.

He said, … “Two days ago, the PSB National Security Detachment came to see me and said that I may not accept interviews. They said so in obscure language — “If you are used by the overseas enemy forces in the media, you are breaking the law, and we can prosecute you.” I know I am getting myself into trouble, but how can anyone say that I am being used? I am just speaking honestly.”

According to statistics available online, there are several million retired soldiers in China. In recent years, petition groups organized by retired military transferred to enterprises have been repressed by local governments. They have been making their appeals for over a decade but these problems still have not been resolved. The Japanese Self-Defense Ministry Defense Research Institute on Friday (March 30) issued the 2012 edition of its “East Asia Strategic Outlook”  东亚战略概观 to analyze Japan’s security environment. The section on Chinese trends notes that China is making progress in modernizing its armaments but that demonstrations by retired soldiers may become a factor that threatens social stability.

Huang Qi, who assists in the protection of the rights of retired soldiers and is the Director of the China Tianwang Human Rights Center, said that since retired soldiers began making joint petition visits, some cases have been successfully resolved while at the same time there has been increasing repression of petitioners as their numbers have risen. The problem of retired soldiers appealing for their welfare and benefits has arisen because the authorities do not treat them fairly. In this away the authorities have buried many time bombs for themselves. The inflation in recent years has made the lives of the people much more difficult and so large-scale rights protection actions by retired soldiers are likely to continue. He hopes that overseas organizations will notice this matters and hopes that they will encourage the mainland local authorities to carry out the policies of the central government and improve the pay and benefits of these retired soldiers who have served their country.

He said, …”It is a very good thing that Japan has taken note of rights protection among retired soldiers and how soldiers are protecting their own rights. This is a sign that rights protection by the people of mainland China is being recognized overseas and shows that everyone understands this problem.

Huang Qi also said “Not only does the problem of the retired veterans need to be solved quickly, but also other problems such as those of the peasants across China who have lost their land, and the people who have been forced to move when their houses were demolished cannot be ignored. We need to resolve these problems and build together a harmonious society.”

—–

中国退伍军人维权势头不容忽视
[ 时间:2012-03-31 02:30:18 | 作者:文宇晴 | 来源:自由亚洲电台粤语部 ]
2012-03-30
近年各地退伍军人上访维权日渐频密,规模也越来越大。当局为排除这些不稳定因素,最近不断向老兵做维稳工作。而日本政府发表的东亚战略报告中,也指出中国退伍军人发起的游行,有可能升级对社会造成动荡。
本台致电数位湖南省退伍军人查询,部份人听到是记者来电便立即挂上电话,其中莫益平只向记者含糊地透露,最近不少人遭当局警告不许接受境外媒体访问,现在很多人都害怕,他也不愿接受访问。
他说︰“我们现在不接电话,我们心里很紧张的。”
记者问︰“是最近的事情吗?”
他回答︰“是。”
记者问︰“有没有说为什么?”
他回答︰“很麻烦的。”
曾在广西服役的湖南省退军人刘之和向维权网表示,由于最近广东退伍军人以集会的形式争取待遇,给予湖南省的退伍军人很大启发,于是也计划以集会形式表达诉求。周四当局以维稳为名向他表示,现在有些退伍军人受坏人煽动,做了一些不利于社会稳定的事,要刘之和千万不要与他们来往。
山东省烟台市企业军转干部曲世涛,近日也遭当地政府警告。他说,周三(28日)有国保要求他不要被境外媒体利用。曲世涛表示,单是在烟台市的企业军转干部超过1万人,假若加上其他性质的退伍军人,数目也难以估计。他们的福利待遇问题多年来一直得不到解决,他认为近期被要求不许接受境外媒体访问,是当局也察觉近年来退伍军人以集会或走上街头的诉求方式越来越,担心问题会进一步扩散,因此才作出警告。
他说︰“前两天国保中队来找我,说不能接受媒体采访。他说得很隐晦,说被海外媒体的敌对势力利用了,就违法了,就可能要法律制裁你。我知道是找麻烦了,我说怎么叫被利用?我是实事求是。”
网上有统计显示,退休军人人数高达数百万人。近年来军转干部组织上访的过程中,不断受到地方政府的打压,他们的诉求十多年来一直没有解决。日本防卫省的防卫研究所周五(30日) 发表的2012版《东亚战略概观》,分析了日本周边的安全环境。其中在关于中国动向方面,指出中国大陆解放军装备现代化正在逐步推进,但退伍军人发起的游行有可能升级为社会不稳定因素。
协助退休军人维权的中国天网人权事务中心负责人黄琦指出,自2006年开始,退伍军人集体上访后,成功得到解决的案例也有发生,不过同时遇到的打压也相继增多。退伍军人争取福利待遇的问题,是当局没有公平对待他们,埋下了无数的定时炸弹。加上近年物价上涨得厉害,百姓生活百上加斤,相信退伍军人的大规模维权行动也会陆续发生。他喜见海外组织关注事件,希望能促请大陆地方政府落实中央政策,改善这些曾为国效力的退休军人福利待遇。
他说︰“这次日本方面关注退伍军人维权,和军人对权益的保护,我觉得是个非常好的事。也说明大陆的民间维权,在海外方面得到认可,也充分说明大家认识到这些问题。”
黄琦又说,不单是退伍军人的问题要尽快解决,全国各地失地农民、拆迁户等问题也不容忽视,应立即处理,共同建造一个和谐的社会。
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